Bone Structure in Design

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A lot of architectural buildings that we see today draw inspiration from various things such as everyday objects, lighting, and even nature.  The overall structure of the human bone tissue is a great example that has inspire a myriad of different designs such as furniture, automotive, airplane as well as buildings. Bones are the ultimate smart composite that are made up of a number of specialized cells and proteins.  Like all structures in the cellular-based living world, this material has been built up from the very small into a larger, complex structure. Osteons are the rod-shaped building blocks of inside the bone, each formed, in turn, of concentric rings of lamellae, each surrounding tiny blood vessels and nerves and each allowing gaps to service the cells. Like the wires in a steel cable, these osteons are bundled together to give strength and stability to the structure, similarly to steal while keeping its overall weight light as aluminum. I can see

The idea of apply bio-mimicry in the form of bone structure is a high innovative concept that can greatly benefit the structural needs of a lot of designs. Since the overall characteristic a bone is strong and lightweight, I can see it being successfully applied in sustainable architecture by reduce the amount of material needed for a design.

Nhi Nguyen Week 12 Blog Post

Source:

https://www.greenbiz.com/blog/2010/01/27/bare-bones-how-our-hardest-organ-inspires-architecture-chairs-and-cars

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2 comments

  1. xion0851

    Chelsy Xiong // Comment 5
    When you wrote, “the overall structure of the human bone tissue is a great example that has inspired a myriad of different designs such as furniture, automotive, airplane as well as buildings.” I would have liked to read about or see details of examples of those. I can’t think of anything that has related to bones but I guess they might have been nicely disguised in society. I would have also known more analogies, if osteons are the rod-shaped building blocks of inside the bone, what would you compare to be the building blocks to modern architecture? Concrete? Cement?

  2. lucasewing

    Lucas Ewing – Comment Week #10

    I very much agree with what you have discussed in the following journal entry, especially your point in achieving biomimicry through the interpretation of bone structure. I would like to think that, in some way, we have already begun to do that in the past. Steel Web Joists (or the I Beam) are constructed in the way they are in order to reduce the material used in the members, since most of the torque applied on these specific members happens mainly in the horizontal components. Also, steel and other building materials sometimes come with parts of material taken out of them in the middle where the excess is not needed to properly disperse structural loads.

    Beyond biomimicry, this picture is quite fascinating in a way with some sort of aesthetic quality. I could see this sort of web-like structure being used to add some appeal to a facade, or even some sort of outdoor pavilion (in which case, the lighting quality could be phenomenal).

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